Hot-Spark Performance Products - Electronic Ignition Conversion Kits for Ford, Delco, Prestolite, Autolite, Bosch, Automotive, Agricultural, Industrial, Marine Distributors

Compatible Coils for Use with HotSpark® Ignition

Applies to Hot-Spark 3-Series (red) ignition kits

Coil Warning: DO NOT use a low-resistance or an HEI-style coil. 4-Cylinder: Use a coil that has resistance in the primary circuit of at least 3.0 Ohms (Ω). 6- and 8-Cylinder: Must be used with a coil that has resistance in the primary circuit of at least 1.5 Ω. Using a coil with insufficient primary resistance can cause the ignition module to overheat and misfire until it cools down again, or fail prematurely, which will void the Hot-Spark ignition warranty.

DO NOT reverse the polarity of the red and black wires - it will destroy the ignition module (and void its warranty)! The Hot-Spark module’s red wire connects to positive ( + or 15 on Bosch coil). The black wire connects to negative ( - or 1 on Bosch coil). Remove the condenser and its wire from vehicle.  All other wires are connected to the coil in their original places. This module is designed for 12V negative ground applications only.

Make sure that the ignition wires have plenty of slack inside the distributor and are not rubbing on any moving parts. If you need to extend the length of the ignition wires, use 18- or 20-gauge (AWG) wire. Crimp tightly or solder (best) and insulate all connections.

Hot-Spark II Electronic Ignition Wiring Diagram

 

 

Compatible Coils

 

The BERU Germany Blue Coil has 3.3 Ω primary resistance. Ideal for 4- and 6-cylinder applications.

 

The HotSpark® HS17HEC high-energy coil (epoxy-filled) has 1.7 Ω primary resistance (for 6- and 8-cylinder applications only).

 

The HotSpark® HS34HEC high-energy coil (epoxy-filled) has 3.4 Ω primary resistance (for 4-cylinder applications).

 

The following 12-volt Bosch® coils should be compatible with the Hot-Spark electronic ignition module (4-cylinder):

 

00 015
0 221 119 021 (Bosch Black coil)
0 221 119 020 (Bosch Black coil) (VW 022 905 115C)
0 221 119 027 (Bosch Blue coil) (VW 043 905 115C)
9 220 081 039 (Brazil)
9 220 081 054 (Brazil)
9 220 081 083 (00 012) (Bosch Blue coil)

0 439 051 15C (00012) (Bosch Silver Coil)

 

The Bosch coils above should have a primary winding with 3.0 to 3.3 Ω resistance. Bosch coils are made in a number of countries, with varying amounts of primary and secondary resistance. It's best to check the coil's primary resistance with an Ohmmeter (a digital multi meter in the 200 mode). Install a 1.4 or so external ballast resistor (HS14BR) between the ignition switch (+12-Volt power source) and the coil's + terminal, if the coil's primary resistance is questionable or borderline.

 

Bosch 0 221 119 030 (Bosch Red Coil, Brazil) 1.6 Ω to 1.8 Ω primary resistance (OK for 6- or 8-cylinder ignition kits, not enough primary resistance for 4-cylinder ignition kits).

 

 

BERU Germany Blue Coil: 3.3 Ω primary resistance

 

 

Lucas® Coil Primary Resistance:

DLB102  1.5 Ω (oil-filled)
DLB110  1.5 Ω (oil-filled)
DLB105  3.0 Ω (oil-filled)
DLB101  3.0 Ω (oil-filled)

Flame-Thrower® (made in China) Coil Primary Resistance:

40001  1.5 Ω (oil-filled)
40011  1.5 Ω (oil-filled)
40111  1.5 Ω (epoxy-filled)
40501  3.0 Ω (oil-filled)
40511  3.0 Ω (oil-filled)
40611  3.0 Ω (epoxy-filled)

Do not use any other Flame-Thrower® coil, as it won't have enough primary resistance, allowing too much amperage to flow to the ignition module, destroying the module or shortening its life.

Inexpensive Coils:

Wells® LU800 3.3 Ω primary, 8.3K Ω secondary resistance (oil-filled)
Duralast® (Autozone®) LU800 3.3 Ω primary, 8.3K Ω secondary resistance (oil-filled)

Epoxy-filled coils can be mounted in any position and are able to withstand more vibration and shock than oil-filled coils.

Measuring Coil Resistance: 4-Cylinder: Coil must have a minimum of 3.0 Ohms primary resistance. 6- and 8-cylinder: Coil must have a minimum of 1.5 Ohms primary resistance. To measure primary resistance: Label and remove all wires to coil ( + or - ). Using a common digital multimeter in the 200 Ω mode, cross the red and black leads of the Ohmmeter. Allow a few seconds for the reading to settle and write down the reading.

Still in the 200 Ohm mode, measure between coil’s + and - terminals. Allow a few seconds for the reading to settle, until it stabilizes. Subtract the previous reading, taken with the leads crossed, to compensate for multimeter’s inherent resistance. Do not use a low-resistance coil, such as the MSD or Accel coil; they don’t have enough primary resistance for this application. Using a coil with too little primary resistance can cause the ignition module to overheat and misfire until it cools down again or fails, voiding the warranty.

Check the voltage reading at the coil's + terminal, engine running, at 2,500+ RPM. If the voltage measures more than +14.0 volts, you'll need to replace the voltage regulator, install a coil with 3.0 Ohms or more internal primary resistance or install a 1.4 Ohm external ballast resistor between the ignition switch and the coil's + terminal. Charging system voltage of 13.6 volts or so is plenty.

For best performance, the coil should also have 7,000 (7K) Ohms or more secondary resistance (measured from coil’s + or – terminal to center high tension terminal, in the 20K Ω mode of the Ohmmeter).

Do not use a coil designed to be used with an external ballast resistor. These coils usually have little-to-no internal primary resistance.

External Ballast Resistor: 6- and 8-Cylinder: If your coil’s primary resistance measures less than 1.5 Ω, you’ll need to replace the coil with one of 1.7 Ω or more primary resistance or to install a 1.4+ Ω external ballast resistor between the ignition switch and the coil’s positive terminal, increasing the total primary resistance to 1.7 Ω or more. 4-Cylinder: Either use a coil with 3.0 Ω or more primary resistance or a coil with 1.6 Ω or more primary resistance and an external ballast resistor with 1.4 Ω or more resistance, wired between the ignition switch and the coil's + terminal.
 
With the ignition switch on and engine not running, the voltage, measured at the coil’s positive terminal, after installing the ballast resistor, should be about the same as battery voltage, or somewhere around 12.5 volts for proper operation of the Hot-Spark ignition module and the coil.

Check Charging System Voltage:
Begin with a fully-charged battery. With the ignition switch in the ON position and the engine not running, measure the voltage at the coil's + terminal. With the voltmeter in the 20-volt setting, touch the black voltmeter lead to engine ground and the red lead to the coil's + terminal. The voltmeter should read between +11 and +13.9 volts. If the voltage reading is less than 10 volts, there is probably a resistor wire or ceramic external ballast resistor wired between the ignition switch and the coil.

If your vehicle’s charging system produces more than 14.0 volts at high RPM (about 2,500+ RPM, measured at coil's positive terminal), we recommend installing an external ballast resistor with about 1.0 to 1.4 Ω resistance, wired between the +12-volt wire from the ignition switch (+12-volt power supply) and the coil’s positive terminal. The extra primary resistance helps to keep the coil and ignition module cool, prolonging their lives and ensuring trouble-free operation. The ballast resistor is usually mounted on the firewall or on or near the coil.

If the charging system voltage, measured at the coil's positive terminal, is more than 14.0 volts at 3,000+ RPM, the voltage regulator likely needs replacing. Too much voltage can damage the coil, ignition module and other electronic components. Maximum charging system voltage of 13.6 volts or so is plenty.


Calculating Amperage to the Distributor
Some vehicles have overactive electrical charging systems, sending 14.0 volts or more to the coil's + terminal, shortening the life of the points, coil or electronic ignition module. If peak charging system voltage exceeds 14.0 volts at 3,000+ RPM, the voltage regulator may need replacing. A modern, solid-state voltage regulator is a big improvement over an older mechanical voltage regulator. To test your ignition system’s compatibility with the Hot-Spark ignition module, you’ll need to run a couple of tests:
 

1. Determine the voltage leading to the coil’s positive terminal from the ignition switch and if a resistor wire is present: Begin with a fully charged battery. Start the engine and let it idle. Connect the black lead of a voltmeter to engine ground. Connect the voltmeter’s red lead to the positive ( + or 15) terminal of the coil and the voltmeter's black lead to engine ground (earth). With the voltmeter in the DCV 20 mode, note the voltage reading. If the voltmeter reads +12 volts or more, there’s little or no resistance in the wire going from the ignition switch to the positive terminal of the coil. If the wire leading from the ignition switch to the coil’s positive terminal is a resistor wire, the voltmeter will typically read +6 to +10 volts DC. Now, start and rev the engine until the voltage stops increasing (usually about 3,000 RPM). Write down the voltage reading.
 

2. Next, measure the resistance of the coil’s primary winding: Label and disconnect all wires going to the coil. Make a note of to which terminal (+ or -) each wire goes. Using an Ohmmeter in the 200 Ohm (Ω) mode, touch the black lead to the coil’s negative terminal and touch the red lead to the coil’s positive terminal. The Ohmmeter will display the resistance of the coil’s primary winding. Allow a few seconds for the resistance reading to settle downward until it stabilizes. Write down the coil’s primary resistance reading (in Ohms).
 

Ohmmeter Calibration: When the Ohmmeter’s red and black leads are connected to each other, the reading should be 0.00 or very close to zero. If, though, for example, with both Ohmmeter leads shorted together, the reading is 0.5 Ω, you’ll need to subtract 0.5 Ω from the reading you get when measuring the coil’s primary resistance. For example, if the coil’s primary resistance reading is 3.5 Ω, but when the Ohmmeter leads are shorted together the reading is 0.5 Ω, then the coil’s primary resistance is 3.0 Ω: 3.5 Ω - 0.5 Ω = 3.0 Ω. This calibration procedure applies only to resistance measurements made in the 200 Ω mode of a digital Ohmmeter. The inherent resistance of the leads is negligible in higher Ω modes of the Ohmmeter. If you’re using an analog Ohmmeter, touch the leads together while setting the needle on zero before measuring resistance.
 

3. Now, divide the voltage reading from Step1 by the coil’s primary resistance, in Ω, from Step 2. For example, if the voltage is 12.75 volts and the coil’s primary resistance is 3.3 Ω, the current running through the points or Hot-Spark module would be 3.86 amps:
 

Example: 12.75 volts / 3.3 Ω = 3.86 amps (OK)
or
Example: 14.3 volts / 3.3 Ω = 4.33 amps (too much current for a 4-cylinder electronic ignition module)
 

More than 4.0 amps of current is too much for the ignition module when used in a 4-cylinder distributor. More than 4.0 amps can cause the module and coil to run too hot and the module and/or coil to possibly misfire or and/or fail. 6- and 8-cylinder ignition kits can be used with an ignition coil that has a minimum of 1.5 Ω primary resistance.
 

All trademarks ® are property of their respective owners.

Hot-Spark Performance Products - Electronic Ignition Conversion Kits for Ford, Delco, Prestolite, Autolite, Bosch, Automotive, Agricultural, Industrial, Marine Distributors

© 2005-2014 HotSpark®

lululemon cyber monday canada goose black friday juicy couture cyber monday juicy couture black friday lululemon cyber monday victoria's secret black friday Ray Ban black friday under armour black friday gucci cyber monday coach cyber monday canada goose cyber monday uggs black friday beats by dre black friday north face black friday canada goose cyber Monday north face black friday north face cyber Monday michael kors cyber monday uggs cyber monday michael kors cyber monday north face cyber Monday uggs black Friday coach cyber monday Babyliss black friday michael kors cyber monday michael kors black friday gucci cyber monday coach black Friday canada goose cyber monday north face black friday north face cyber monday kate spade cyber monday uggs cyber monday michael kors cyber Monday michael kors cyber Monday north face black friday michael kors black Friday north face cyber monday deals michael kors cyber Monday uggs cyber monday michael kors cyber Monday moncler cyber monday michael kors black Friday the north face cyber monday michael kors black Friday the north face cyber monday uggs cyber monday uggs cyber monday beats by dre black friday uggs cyber monday lululemon black friday canada goose black friday beats by dre cyber Monday uggs black friday Montblanc cyber monday abercrombie and fitch cyber Monday Juicy Couture black friday north face black friday north face cyber monday beats by dre black Friday